Sunday, July 29, 2018

DIY Master Bathroom Vanity

Bathroom vanities can be an expensive project.  When we first moved in, we weren't planning on remodeling the MB vanities right away, but we were forced to do so due to a leak of one of the faucets under the sink.  The faucet had to be replaced, so one thing led to this project!  We needed to save money while making the needed repairs, so we went the DIY route of course.

I have posted about this project a really long time ago in a 4 part series, but it has had such a great response on Pinterest that I thought I would post about it again in a shorter more condensed version of the first series.
This is actually one of the first projects we ever did in our home.   This is my honey's side of the bathroom back in June of 2011.  I've changed the decor a bit since then. lol! :)
Here's how the vanities looked when we moved in.  Not terribly awful with its shell shaped sink in faux blue swirled marble top, but not so much up to date either!  Surely not our style!  That faucet there was the culprit and reason for the whole makeover.

NOTE:  You can see my method of painting our cabinets by clicking right here.

Speaking of shell shaped sinks, look at this beauty!  Wow! So pretty!
We like the rustic but new look.  Does that make sense?  When we were trying to figure out what route to take in building the vanity top, my honey had the idea to "rough up" the boards a bit to make the wood look old and used, like an old barn floor would look.  We started out with (4) 2 x 6 boards and used some chain and other tools to beat them up a bit.
We may have went a little overboard and definitely took out our aggression on these poor boards, but this is what they looked like when we were done.  We used our hand sander and smoothed down all the rough areas so it would be safe for us to use daily.
Its hard to tell in this picture, but the four big boards were all held together using 2 x 4s glued and screwed on to the already glued together 2 x 6s.  We use gorilla wood glue for all our wood working projects and it did a fine job sealing any gaps there may have been in between each of the 2 x 6s.
To finish the vanity tops so they would last forever, I applied one coat of Minwax Dark Walnut stain, then lightly sanded it with a very fine 220 sand paper.  Lastly I applied two coats of Minwax Polyurethane to seal the wood and guard against any water damage. We've been using these counter tops since 2011 and its test of "water-proof-ness" has very much been tried and still passes with flying colors.
We used a standard white bowl sink.  I love the crisp white on the dark wood.  Its just so fresh and clean looking to me.  At the time, these sinks were the most inexpensive ones we could find locally and they have held up so nicely.  Even now, right after a good scrubbing, they still look new.
We chose to use the oil rubbed bronze finish for our fixtures in our bathroom so of course we picked out some faucets to match.  This faucet wasn't really made for a bowl sink, but we made it work and they are still working great today!
The sinks were added very easily with some clear silicone for bathrooms.  He added a nice bead along the bottom and then after he placed the sink in its spot, he made one bead around the bottom edge to seal out any water that may try and get through.
You may have noticed the wall was a bit damaged after we removed the lovely blue swirl marble back splash so we added a little natural stone tile to create a fresh and clean look again.
Lovely and oh so rustic looking.  Perfect for our little farmhouse theme in our home we've going on.
We've done so much more in our master bathroom since the vanity project and if you'd like to, you can read about those projects by clicking right here.

I have listed all the original post about the processes of the vanity down below if you'd like to see more pictures and get more details.

Master Vanity Part 1 - Click here.
Master Vanity Part 2 - Click here.
Master Vanity Part 3 - Click here. 
Master Vanity Part 4 - Click here.
Painting Our Cabinets - Click here.

It doesn't have to be done all at once.  It is a slow process in the works! C-ya next time!
 

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2 comments:

  1. You could cut a hole in the counter and drop your sink into it halfway - to make it work better with the faucet.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Sharon! Seven years later it works great the way it is for us, but yes, you could certainly do that! :)

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