Sunday, June 17, 2018

Makeover on a Worn Oak Table to a Farmhouse Fresh Beauty

If you follow my blog, you probably remember this post where I told you I really needed to re-do our dining room table. I finally did it!  I ended up using 7 steps to complete this table.  It was a lot of work, but so worth it.
I recently got this lovely vintage doilie and its a perfect finish for my newly made over table.  I got it from @jackandmaryjane on Instagram.  If you like vintage stuff, Kayla is your girl! Go check her out!
Like I told you in that linked post above, it was getting harder and harder to keep the white heat marks off the table.  The finish on it was practically gone all together.  Although the top was really sad, the bottom part wasn't in that bad of shape.
When we purchased it over 6 years ago, it had two very bad water damage spots on it.  You can see them there, one on the left and one on the right.  I only needed to sand the top because I wanted to get rid of those marks if I could, before I added the new stain to it.
I used a rotary sander starting out with 60 grit sand paper, then going to 120 grit and then finally 220 grit to make it nice and smooth.
I used the mouse sander because it is smaller and easier to handle, to do the very rounded edge using the same steps in sand paper grit.
You can see here I didn't touch the skirt of the table nor the base and legs with the sander because I knew I was going to paint those and the miracle product I use requires NO SANDING! Yay!
This is what it looked like after I got all the sanding done.  I can still see the water damage marks just a little bit, but I think its because I know exactly where they are.  The top is a veneer, so this was the very best I could do and still keep that veneer in tact.
I bought a very small can of Minwax Weathered Oak 270 stain to try because I really liked the hint of gray it had on the swatch at the lumber store.
It was not showing any signs of gray even after I tried two coats and it was really light in color, so I opted for a darker color.
My old faithful.  Minwax Dark Walnut 2716 stain.  I've used this on so many of my projects.  I think it must be my favorite.
I used a sponge brush to apply it.  Trying hard to go with the grain of the wood if I could.
I applied this right over top of the Weathered oak that I had first tried.  I applied a generous coat and let it sit until it all soaked in and then buffed it gently with a clean dry cloth.  I cut up old T-shirts for projects like this, they are the perfect cloth for the task.
Look at that wood grain! So pretty now.  Yes, I still see you water damage mark, you don't have to wave at me! lol! :)  Even though the marks are still visible to me, this top is 1000% times better than it was when I started out.
Here's my miracle product I hinted about up above.  The Zinsser primer for all surfaces.  Just read the label there.  It does everything it says it does.  I love it and have used it on lots of projects in the past.  No telling how many cans I've purchased over the years.
Just brush it on right over top of any stained surface and let it dry really good and then you're ready for paint.
You don't have to be neat and tidy, just slather it on and it'll do the trick.  I'd just make sure your coats are even and covering with no runs or drips.  I guess that's neat and tidy huh? lol!
Here's the paint I chose, Olympic ONE.  It's a paint and primer all in one.  I got it from Lowe's and the color is Atrium White.  It's an interior flat paint.  I chose flat because I knew I was going to distress it and make it look old and worn and also the sealer I use has a slight satin finish to it.
This picture has one coat of Zinsser primer and one coat of Atrium White paint on it.  Although its really pretty, I can't leave anything alone, I have to distress it and make it look old.
Here's another product I've used a lot in my past projects.  Valspar Antiquing glaze in Asphaltium.  It's a blackish gray color.
I use an old piece of T-shirt to apply it.  For the carvings, I applied it very heavy and let it settle into all the grooves.  Simply wipe away the excess with a damp cloth.
If you get too heavy handed while distressing your piece, simply wipe away with a damp cloth what you don't want there.  Easy!
I let everything sit over night to make sure it was good and dry.  I used this Minwax fast drying polyurethane in clear satin to seal the top.  I always use a foam brush and this time I gave it four coats.  Each coat has to dry 3-4 hours.  Just follow the directions on the can.
Left hand side with poly, right hand side still just the stain.  The stain color will intensify when you add the poly, so keep that in mind with choosing your color of stain.
Now to seal the skirt, base and legs where I painted.  I like this Valspar Clear Protector for faux finishes.  It seriously looks like glue and dries quickly and it last!  I used this on all my kitchen cabinets and its holding up great!
All done and drying!  I love how it turned out.  It has the perfect amount of distressing and I'm just fine with it getting some natural distressing over the years as well.
We are missing a chair.  One broke beyond repair.  I'm still debating on trying to find another chair to match and then paint them or just get all new chairs.  Decisions, decisions!

Here are a few more of my painting make overs:

Entry Hall Table Makeover
$5 Bedside Table Makeover
Chalk Painted Picture Frame with Free Lavender Print
Painting Our Laundry Room Cabinets

It doesn't have to be done all at once.  It is a slow process in the works! C-ya next time!

I'm Linking to:
These lovely and FUN parties!
Between Naps on the Porch
The Dedicated House  - (I was featured)

Pin It!